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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Frederick Dental Group
February 25, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures

Severely Damaged TeethFind out if your smile could benefit from oral surgery.

From impacted wisdom teeth to severe jaw joint issues, there are several reasons why someone may need to turn to oral surgery to correct a dental problem. Luckily, Dr. Dave Verma and Dr. Arpana Verma in Frederick, MD, have dealt with a variety of cases and can expertly diagnose whether or not you may require oral surgery. Here are the top reasons why someone might need surgery and how to tell if it’s time to schedule a consultation with us!

Impacted Teeth

This mostly affects wisdom teeth, which are the third set of molars to develop, and usually erupt in your late teens or early twenties. At our Frederick office, we will be able to see them in x-rays to determine if they are growing in straight or if they might come in crooked.

In most cases, wisdom teeth will be impacted, which means that they don’t fully emerge through the gums. They can also grow in crooked and cause damage to neighboring teeth, which is why wisdom teeth are often removed. Even if they aren’t causing you issues, they could cause problems down the road, which is why they should be extracted as soon as possible.

Issues with the Jaw Joint

A lot of people deal with a condition known as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder, which is caused by dysfunction within the jaw joints. Those with TMJ disorder may experience jaw pain and stiffness, and may even hear a popping or clicking sound when they open or close their jaws. While most of the time symptoms of a TMJ disorder can be treated with simple at-home care, if the symptoms that you are experiencing are severe and don’t respond to treatment, oral surgery may be then recommended to correct joint dysfunction.

Dental Implants

If you are a healthy adult who is missing at least one tooth, you may be considering getting dental implants, a metal restoration that functions like tooth roots. In order to place the dental implant into the jawbone, surgery will have to be performed, though this procedure is minimal and pain-free. Implants look and feel completely natural, and before you know it, you will forget that they are even there!

If you are dealing with any of these issues above, or if you are noticing changes in your smile that give you pause, then it’s important to let the dentists at Frederick Dental Group provide your smile with the care it deserves. Call our Frederick, MD, dental office at (301) 624-1001 to schedule an appointment today!

By Frederick Dental Group
February 19, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: local anesthesia  
LocalAnesthesiaTakesthePainOutofMostDentalWork

Long ago dental work could be painful and stressful—often for both patient and practitioner. Thankfully, that time is long past: today, most procedures are painless in large part due to local anesthesia.

Local anesthetics are numbing substances applied to specific areas of the body like the teeth and gums to temporarily block pain during a procedure. And because they only affect a localized area of the body, you remain conscious and alert throughout the procedure.

To achieve the level of numbing necessary for dental work, we often need to deaden the gums using a needle to deliver the anesthetic. But then this poses a secondary pain concern—the needle stick itself.

Again, topical anesthesia comes to the rescue in the form of a swab, patch or spray applying an anesthetic directly to the top layer of the gums at the injection site. This numbs the area and prevents you from feeling the needle stick. It's highly probable, therefore, that from start to finish you won't feel any discomfort during your dental work except perhaps for a little pressure.

Local anesthesia truly is a game changer for dental care—and not just for the patient. A dentist who's concerned about their patient's comfort level may work hurriedly to complete a procedure. But if their patient is relaxed, the dentist can work calmly and methodically. The result is better, more focused care.

For all its improvements in the patient experience, though, there has been one consistent complaint—the numbness that often lingers for a while after the procedure is over. But there have been advances in recent years that have helped reduce this irritation: new anesthetic agents (even some that can reverse the anesthetic effect) and fine-tuned dosages can help keep residual numbing to a minimum.

Not all procedures like routine teeth cleanings or enamel shaping require anesthesia. But when it's appropriate, local anesthesia can make your next dental visit much more pleasant.

If you would like more information on how anesthesia benefits your dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Local Anesthesia for Pain-Free Dentistry.”

3ThingsYouMightNoticewithYourChildsTeethThatNeedaDentist

Dental disease doesn’t discriminate by age. Although certain types of disease are more common in adults, children are just as susceptible, particularly to tooth decay.

Unfortunately, the early signs of disease in a child’s teeth can be quite subtle—that’s why you as a parent should keep alert for any signs of a problem. Here are 3 things you might notice that definitely need your dentist’s attention.

Cavities. Tooth decay occurs when mouth acid erodes tooth enamel and forms holes or cavities. The infection can continue to grow and affect deeper parts of the tooth like the pulp and root canals, eventually endangering the tooth’s survival. If you notice tiny brown spots on their teeth, this may indicate the presence of cavities—you should see your dentist as soon as possible. To account for what you don’t see, have your child visit your dentist at least twice a year for cleanings and checkups.

Toothache. Tooth pain can range from a sensitive twinge of pain when eating or drinking hot or cold foods to a throbbing sharp pain. Whatever its form, a child’s toothache might indicate advancing decay in which the infection has entered the tooth pulp and is attacking the nerves. If your child experiences any form of toothache, see your dentist the next day if possible. Even if the pain goes away, don’t cancel the appointment—it’s probable the infection is still there and growing.

Bleeding gums. Gums don’t normally bleed during teeth brushing—the gums are much more resilient unless they’ve been weakened by periodontal (gum) disease (although over-aggressive brushing could also be a cause). ┬áIf you notice your child’s gums bleeding after brushing, see your dentist as soon as possible—the sooner they receive treatment for any gum problems the less damage they’ll experience, and the better chance of preserving any affected teeth.

If you would like more information on dental care for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Frederick Dental Group
January 02, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental EquipmentFrom wisdom tooth removal to root canal therapy, oral surgery helps you protect your oral health and restore your smile. From their Frederick, MD, office, dentists Dr. Dave Verma and Dr. Arpana Verma of Frederick Dental Group use the latest oral surgery techniques to correct and repair problems that affect the teeth and jaw.

Wisdom tooth extraction

Wisdom tooth extraction is one of the most common types of oral surgery in the U.S. Although a third set of molars could be useful, many people just don't have room in their mouths for the normal eruption of wisdom teeth. Despite the lack of space, the teeth still try to erupt, causing pain, infections, and even difficulty in chewing or even possible nerve damage in some cases. Oral surgery may be recommended if your wisdom teeth are completely covered by bone and gum tissue (fully impacted) or partially covered (partially impacted), or have an infection or cysts.

Dental implants

Oral surgery is the first step in the dental implant process. After comfortably numbing your mouth, the jaw bone is prepared to accept the implant and the dentist places the titanium implants. These implants, will serve as synthetic roots, and begin to bond to the surrounding bone. Attaching dental crowns to the implants then creates brand new teeth that feel just like those that you have lost.

Bone grafts

Jawbone depth is an important consideration when placing dental implants in your mouth. Luckily, depth issues don't have to prevent you from receiving implants. Bone grafts can deepen and strengthen the bone, making dental implants a possibility. During this type of oral surgery, your dentist adds bone Graft Materials putty, granules, or powder to your jawbone. In just a few months, new bone will form around the grafts, making it possible to proceed with your implant. Bone Grafts are generally recommended at the time of dental extractions to build and maintain the bone for future implant placement and retard the natural atrophy that occurs after a tooth is extracted.

Safeguard your oral health with oral surgery. Whether you need oral surgery or other dental services, your Frederick, MD, dentists at Frederick Dental Group Dr. Dave Verma and Dr. Arpana Verma can help. Call them at (301) 624-1001 to schedule an appointment.

ProtectingPrimaryTeethfromDecayHelpsEnsureFutureDentalHealth

A baby’s teeth begin coming in just a few months after birth—first one or two in the front, and then gradually the rest of them over the next couple of years. We often refer to these primary teeth as deciduous—just like trees of the same description that shed their leaves, a child’s primary teeth will all be gone by around puberty.

It’s easy to think of them as “minor league,” while permanent teeth are the real superstars. But although they don’t last long, primary teeth play a big role in a person’s dental health well into their adult years.

Primary teeth serve two needs for a child: enabling them to eat, speak and smile in the present; but more importantly, helping to guide the developing permanent teeth to erupt properly in the future. Without them, permanent teeth can come in misaligned, affecting dental function and appearance and increasing future treatment costs.

That’s why we consider protecting primary teeth from decay a necessity for the sake of future dental health. Decay poses a real threat for children, especially an aggressive form known as early childhood caries (ECC). ECC can quickly decimate primary teeth because of their thinner enamel.

There are ways you can help reduce the chances of ECC in your child’s teeth. Don’t allow them to drink throughout the day or to go to sleep at night with a bottle or “Sippy” cup filled with milk, formula, or even juice. These liquids can contain sugars and acids that erode enamel and accelerate decay. You should also avoid sharing eating utensils with a baby or even kissing them on the mouth to avoid the transfer of disease-causing bacteria.

And even before teeth appear, start cleaning their gums with a clean, wet cloth right after feeding. After teeth appear, begin brushing and flossing to reduce plaque, the main trigger for tooth decay. And you should also begin regular dental visits no later than their first birthday. Besides teeth cleanings and checkups for decay, your dentist has a number of measures like sealants or topical fluoride to protect at-risk teeth from disease.

Helping primary teeth survive to their full lifespan is an important goal in pediatric dentistry. It’s the best strategy for having healthy permanent teeth and a bright dental health future.

If you would like more information on tooth decay in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Do Babies Get Tooth Decay?