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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Frederick Dental Group
January 06, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  

If you are looking for ways to replace missing teeth, Frederick Dental Group can help. We offer several denture options, including both removable and fixed options. Our experienced dentists will work with you to find the best solution to fit your life. Dr. Dave Verma and Dr. Arpana Verma are professionals who will create affordable dentures for you in Frederick, MD. We are always accepting new patients and look forward to assisting you with various denture options.

Who Should Get Dentures?

Dentures are a replacement for missing teeth. They can replace some or all the teeth in your upper and/or lower jaw. Dentures are useful for people who have lost one or more teeth due to injury, tooth decay, gum problems, an oral infection, or old age.

What are the Different Types of Dentures?

Partial Dentures

A partial denture is an affordable option to replace multiple missing teeth. They are custom-made to fit your mouth. With a partial denture, you can eat and smile again, restoring your confidence in public. The replacement teeth fit around your existing teeth. These dentures can be made in different ways, often allowing them to be nearly invisible when worn. Partial dentures are easier to create and deliver without inconveniencing the patient. 

Conventional Full Dentures 

With a conventional set, your new teeth will come out of the mouth in one piece, and you will need to remove them at night. Complete dentures can be more inconvenient. Most patients will elect to have IMMEDIATE DENTURES. If you want fast, affordable dentures in Frederick, MD, we can give you immediate dentures. With an immediate denture, we will measure your mouth and fit you for dentures. The teeth are removed, and the dentures are immediately inserted into your mouth following the procedure. This skips over being without teeth which patients appreciate a great deal. There are more adjustments with this type of denture and a final denture is typically constructed once healing is complete. A more CONVENTIONAL/TRADITIONAL route is to remove all the teeth, allow multiple weeks of healing prior to construction of dentures. Most patients find this way to be quite inconvenient as they have to be edentuous for multiple weeks before having their dentures made. 

The Frederick Dental Group is the perfect place for all your dentures options in Frederick, MD. Call Drs. Verma at (301) 624-1001 for an appointment today. We look forward to helping you get your smile back!

SupermodelAshleyGrahamsUnpleasantDentalEncounterWithaFrozenCookie

Ashley Graham has a beautiful and valuable smile—an important asset to her bustling career as a plus-size model and television host. But she recently revealed on Instagram a “confrontation” between one of her teeth and a frozen oatmeal cookie. The cookie won.

Holding her hand over her mouth during the video until the last moment, Graham explained how she sneaked a cookie from her mom's freezer and took a bite of the frozen treat. Taking her hand from her mouth, she revealed her broken tooth.

Okay, maybe it wasn't an actual tooth that was broken: the denticle in question appeared to have been previously altered to accommodate a porcelain veneer or crown. But whatever was once there wasn't there anymore.

Although her smile was restored without too much fuss, Graham's experience is still a cautionary tale for anyone with dental work (and kudos to her for being a good sport and sharing it). Although dental work in general is quite durable, it is not immune to damage. Biting down on something hard, even as delicious as one of mom's frozen oatmeal cookies, could run you the risk of popping off a veneer or loosening a crown.

To paraphrase an old saying: Take care of your dental work, and it will take care of you. Don't use your teeth in ways that put your dental work at risk, tempting as it may be given your mouth's mechanical capabilities.

¬†Even so, it's unwise—both for dental work and for natural teeth—to use your teeth and jaws for tasks like cracking nuts or prying open containers. You should also avoid biting into foods or substances with hard textures like ice or a rock-hard cookie from the freezer, especially if you have veneers or other cosmetic improvements.

It's equally important to clean your mouth daily, and undergo professional cleanings at least twice a year. That might not seem so important at first since disease-causing organisms won't infect your dental work's nonliving materials. But infection can wreak havoc on natural tissues like gums, remaining teeth or underlying bone that together often support dental enhancements. Losing that support could lead to losing your dental work.

And it's always a good idea to have dental work, particularly dentures, checked regularly. Conditions in the mouth can change, sometimes without you noticing them, so periodic examinations by a trained dental provider could prevent or treat a problem before it adversely affects your dental work.

We're glad Ashley Graham's trademark smile wasn't permanently harmed by that frozen cookie, and yours probably wouldn't be either in a similar situation. But don't take any chances, and follow these common sense tips for protecting your dental work.

If you would like more information on care and maintenance of cosmetic dental work, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Veneers: Strength & Beauty as Never Before” and “Dental Implant Maintenance.”

By Frederick Dental Group
October 09, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tooth decay  
WereImprovingOurEffectivenessinTreatingToothDecay

For several decades, dentists have been saving teeth from tooth decay following a few basic guidelines: 1) Identify decay as soon as possible; 2) Thoroughly remove decayed tooth structure; and 3) Fill any cavities. With millions of diseased teeth rescued, observing these simple steps have proven a rousing success.

But as with most things, even this successful protocol isn't perfect. For one, some healthy tissue gets removed along with the diseased portions. The average percentage of "collateral damage" has dropped over the years, but it still happens—and a reduction in healthy tissue can make a tooth less structurally sound.

Another drawback, at least from the patient's perspective, is the dental drill used for removing decay and preparing cavities for filling. Many people find drilling unpleasant, whether from its vibrations in the mouth or its high-pitched whine. The drill's burr head design also contributes to greater healthy tissue loss.

But those weaknesses have lessened over the last few years, thanks to innovations on a number of fronts.

Better risk management. Tooth decay doesn't occur out of thin air—it arises out of risk factors unique to an individual patient like personal hygiene, bacterial load, saliva production or even genetics. Taking the time to identify a patient's "tooth decay risk score" can lead to customized treatments and practices that can minimize the occurrence of decay.

Earlier detection. Like other aspects of dental health, the sooner we detect decay, the less damage it causes and the more successful our treatment. X-rays remain the workhorse for detecting decay, but now with improvements like digital film and better equipment. We're also using newer technologies like laser fluorescence and infrared technology that can "see" decay that might otherwise go undetected.

Less invasive treatment. The dental drill is now being used less with the advent of air abrasion technology. Air abrasion utilizes a concentrated spray of particles to remove diseased tooth structure more precisely than drilling. That means less healthy tissue loss—and a more pleasant (and quieter!) experience for the patient.

In effect, "less is more" could describe these improvements to traditional decay treatment. They and other methods promise healthier teeth and happier patients.

If you would like more information on current treatments for tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Minimally Invasive Dentistry: When Less Care is More.”

By Frederick Dental Group
September 08, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   crowns  
HowCelineDionOvercameHerSmileObstacle

For over three decades, Celine Dion has amazed audiences and fans with her powerful singing voice. Best known for her recording of "My Heart Will Go On," the theme song for the movie Titanic, Dion has amassed global record sales topping 200 million. In her early singing days, though, she struggled with one particular career obstacle: an unattractive smile.

The Canadian-born performer had a number of dental defects including crooked and discolored teeth, and—most prominent of all—abnormally large cuspid or "canine" teeth (located on either side of the four front incisors). They were so noticeable that one Quebec celebrity magazine gave her the unflattering nickname "Canine Dion."

This isn't an unusual problem. Since human canines are already the longest teeth in the mouth, it doesn't take much for them to stand out. Our ancient hunter-gatherer ancestors needed these large, pointed teeth to survive. But with the evolution of agriculture and industry, canine teeth have become gradually smaller—so much so that when they're abnormally large, they don't look right in a smile.

So, what can be done if your canines embarrassingly stand out from the rest? Here are some of the options to consider.

Reduce their size. If your canines are just a tad too long, it may be possible to remove some of the enamel layer in a procedure called contouring. Using this technique, we can reduce a tooth's overall size, which we then re-shape by bonding composite resin to the tooth. It's only a good option, though, if your canines have an ample and healthy layer of enamel.

Repair other teeth. The problem of prominent canine teeth may actually be caused by neighboring teeth. When the teeth next to the canines are crooked, the canines can appear more prominent. Alternatively, other teeth around the canines may be abnormally small. Braces or clear aligners can correct crooked incisors, and applying porcelain veneers to smaller teeth could help normalize their length.

Apply dental crowns. In some instances, we can reduce the canines in size and then bond porcelain crowns to them. This is the option that Dion ultimately chose. The natural teeth are still intact, but the crowning process transforms them into properly proportioned, life-like teeth. There is, however, one caveat: The alteration to these teeth will be permanent, so they will need a crown from then on.

Besides crowning her canine teeth, Dion also underwent other dental work to straighten and whiten her other teeth. As a result, this superstar performer now has a superstar smile to match and so can you if your teeth are less than perfect. These or other cosmetic enhancements can give you the look you truly desire. All it takes is an initial visit with us to start you on the road to a transformed smile.

If you would like more information about various cosmetic solutions for your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Dental Crowns.”

By Frederick Dental Group
August 31, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: sedation dentistry  

Dental anxiety can make even the simplest dental procedures scary. Developing a relationship with your trusted dentist can help put you at ease during your next dental appointment. Your dentist, Dr. Dave Verma, and Dr. Arpana Verma of Frederick Dental Group offer sedation dentistry in Frederick, MD, to make your dental appointments more comfortable.

What is Sedation Dentistry?

Sedation dentistry helps you relax as your dentist attends to you. Sedation dentistry is different from general anesthesia as you can usually stay awake while your dentist works. However, your dentist can sometimes put you to sleep for specific dental procedures. Sedation dentistry in Frederick, MD, can help if you have dental anxiety, are super sensitive to pain, or have a strong gag reflex. It may also be necessary for dental procedures that take a long time.

Forms of Dental Sedation

Oral Sedation

These are oral medications that your dentist can give you before your dental appointment. They help you relax during your procedure and reduce your discomfort. A huge advantage of oral sedation is that there is no need to start an IV. That makes it an excellent choice if you're scared of needles.

Inhaled Minimal Sedation

Here, your dentist places a mask delivering nitrous oxide, better known as laughing gas, over your nose. Laughing gas acts rapidly and helps you get comfortable during your dental appointment. Its effects typically wear off as the gas is turned off allowing you to function normally after the procedure with no lingering effects.

Sedation dentistry is safe with minimal side effects. The dentists here at Frederick Dental Group are highly trained in Sedation Dentistry.  Join the hundreds of patients before you who have conquered their fear of going to the dentist by having their dentistry done with sedation. Call (301) 624-1001 to schedule your dental appointment today.